Perseid Meteor ShowerNot as great as last year but still worthy of watching. The Full Moon will compete with the shower this year, lowering the peak-rates to around 40 or 60 meteors per hour at best, even in the darkest of skies. The peak time is Aug 10-13 but you can see meteors for about a week before and after, so start watching now! The earlier you watch, the less the moon will be in the way, so watching a few days before the peak might actually be better if not the same. For more stargazing events this month, see What’s Up for August. Also, Semi-Relevant/Informative post from last year

Perseid Meteor Shower
Not as great as last year but still worthy of watching. The Full Moon will compete with the shower this year, lowering the peak-rates to around 40 or 60 meteors per hour at best, even in the darkest of skies. The peak time is Aug 10-13 but you can see meteors for about a week before and after, so start watching now! The earlier you watch, the less the moon will be in the way, so watching a few days before the peak might actually be better if not the same. For more stargazing events this month, see What’s Up for August. Also, Semi-Relevant/Informative post from last year

Exploring Mt Lemmon again with my new lens. Did some Star Trails this time, showing about 30 minutes of Earth’s rotation.. Perseids are coming soon btw!
Flickr // 500px

Just messing around up on Mt. Lemmon again. I climbed up some rock near the top to try and get a panoramic for the first time, but that didn’t work out so I got this instead. There were other people up there as well but they were down where I took these photos, and of course we were having laser battles! They ended up being people I knew which was really cool, one of them being a photographer (check out his work).
I’m also on: Flickr // 500px

Some shots I got while watching the Camelopardalid meteor shower this weekend. Not so much a meteor storm, at least where I was watching anyway, it was still pretty decent tho. Saw a couple of meteors, usually relatively big ones. The meteor in the first pic on the right traveled really slowly and took about 3-4 seconds to burn up, really cool to watch. Love this stuff! Follow me on Flickr or 500px if you’d like, higher-quality pics on those sites. Still deciding whether or not I want to get back into regular science-blogging, probably will sometime soon. Anyway see you all around, keep looking up!

nebullama:

Actually brought my good camera out during sunset for once

I’m kind of proud of these. Fucking gorgeous sunset amiright? On flickr also.

This is basically what I did over winter break, just blog on the interwebs, hang out with friends, stargaze, some photography, hiking and jog around sunset pretty much everyday while listening to podcasts like SGU. Twas a good break indeed. Now the semester has started again and I will be focusing on that so expect fewer posts from me. This is my official goodbye since I kind of just stopped posting things without any warning last semester, oops. There are plenty of other science blogs out there tho so don’t worry, #Science is a good place to start.

My High School Chemistry Cheat Sheet
4 years later and I still use this, it has been good to me. Not sure how or if I should credit this, it was just a hand-out my teacher gave us all at the beginning of class and I couldn’t find anything like it online so I just scanned it.

Star Trails
Was out near the Kitt Peak Observatory for this. Stacked about 30 different photos together using ‘Lighten’ and gradually brought up the opacity to give the comet-tail effect. Showing about 15 minutes of Earth’s rotation.
Full size on Flickr

zerostatereflex:

"Using ultrasound, a team of Japanese scientists has levitated small particles, and moved them around mid-air."

Incredible!

Three-Dimensional Mid-Air Acoustic Manipulation (2013-)
Yoichi Ochiai (The University of Tokyo)
Takayuki Hoshi (Nagoya Institute of Technology)
Jun Rekimoto (The University of Tokyo / Sony CSL)

Awesome!
Here is another thing on acoustic levitation

neuromorphogenesis:

Dream On: Why Sleep is So Important 

This infographic showcases some studies on just how dangerous—and costly—sacrificing sleep can be, and it concludes with some facts on how you can try and improve your sleep quality if it’s something you struggle with. 

by  JASON (FRUGAL DAD)

scienceyoucanlove:

Fact of the Day:
Persistent Pupillary Membrane (PPM) is a condition where remnants of the pupillary membrane, which covers the anterior surface of the lens during embryonic development, sustains as thin, web-like strands of connective or vascular tissue across the pupil. It rarely interferes with vision and usually deteriorates of its own accord. In rare, severe cases, it can be treated with laser eye surgery. Further reading: http://goo.gl/HVw6mD
(Photograph: EyeRounds.org, The University of Iowa www.webeye.ophth.uiowa.edu)

source 

sci-universe:

The first of the 2014 meteor showers – The Quadrantids –
peak on 3rd January. It is estimated that they will hit somewhere between 60 and 120 meteors per hour.

To find the Quadrantids’ radiant - the region in which the meteors seem to emanate - look for the constellation Boötes in the ea
st-northeast sky. Observers can look forward to dark skies since the night sky will be Moonless.
The meteor shower is predicted to climax around 19:30 Universal Time or or 2:30 PM Eastern Standard Time (EST). This places the northern Asia region in the best position to watch the show, though all northern hemisphere observers are encouraged to watch past 11 PM local worldwide. Remember: meteor showers are fickle beasties, with peak activity often arriving early or late. If you want more information, try Sky and Telescope/Universe Today/ Time and Date/Bad Astronomy
Image: Quadrantid Meteor through Trees by Jeff Berkes, 2011

Totally forgot about this! Gonna get some pics!

I doubt rates will get as high as 120/hour, maybe 60 tops with an average rate of ~25Apparently this meteor shower will peak at a much better time next year, near midnight instead of late-morning like this year, but there’s a full Moon then so watch it now unless you want to wait until 2016.
You will see higher rates the more north you live, since Bootes is near the North Star. And hey, there’s no bitchass Moon to ruin everything this time, yay!

Even more info, American Meteor Society
If anyone else is going to try and photograph it, here is a guide
Here is a chrome app to help find constellations too, Planetarium

naturalose:

Species in the Rhinochimaera family are known as long-nosed chimaeras. Their unusually long snouts (compared to other chimaeras) have sensory nerves that allow the fish to find food. Also, their first dorsal fin contains a mildly venomous spine that is used defensively. They are found in deep, temperate and tropical waters between 200 to 2,000 m in depth, and can grow to be up to 140 cm (4.5 ft) in length.
Chimaeras (also known as ghost sharks and ratfish) are an order of cartilaginous fish most closely related to sharks, but they have been evolutionarily isolated from them for over 400 million years.
(Info from WP and .gif from video by NOAA’s Okeanos Explorer, July 2013—this is NOT an animation!)

naturalose:

Species in the Rhinochimaera family are known as long-nosed chimaeras. Their unusually long snouts (compared to other chimaeras) have sensory nerves that allow the fish to find food. Also, their first dorsal fin contains a mildly venomous spine that is used defensively. They are found in deep, temperate and tropical waters between 200 to 2,000 m in depth, and can grow to be up to 140 cm (4.5 ft) in length.

Chimaeras (also known as ghost sharks and ratfish) are an order of cartilaginous fish most closely related to sharks, but they have been evolutionarily isolated from them for over 400 million years.

(Info from WP and .gif from video by NOAA’s Okeanos Explorer, July 2013—this is NOT an animation!)

zerostatereflex:

"Watch what happens when force is applied to amazing and mind bending Non-Newtonian Liquid and filmed in slow motion."

What is it?

Oobleck

"An inexpensive, non-toxic example of a non-Newtonian fluid is a suspension of starch (e.g. cornstarch) in water, sometimes called “oobleck” or “ooze” (1 part of water to 1.5–2 parts of corn starch]. [8][9] Uncooked imitation custard, a suspension of primarily cornflour, has the same properties. The name “oobleck” is derived from the Dr. Seuss book Bartholomew and the Oobleck.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-Newtonian_fluid

freshphotons:

"Taken by Igor Siwanowicz, the photo shows the open trap of an aquatic carnivorous plant known as a humped bladderwort (Utricularia gibba). The plant floats in water waiting for its prey to touch its trigger hairs, which cause the plant to open its trap so quickly that it sucks in water as well as some unlucky microinvertebrates. The pretty little flakes near the bottom of the image are single-cell algae that live inside the trap. The image is magnified 100 times." Via.

10 second exposure from 2013 to 2014