nebullama:

Actually brought my good camera out during sunset for once

I’m kind of proud of these. Fucking gorgeous sunset amiright? On flickr also.

This is basically what I did over winter break, just blog on the interwebs, hang out with friends, stargaze, some photography, hiking and jog around sunset pretty much everyday while listening to podcasts like SGU. Twas a good break indeed. Now the semester has started again and I will be focusing on that so expect fewer posts from me. This is my official goodbye since I kind of just stopped posting things without any warning last semester, oops. There are plenty of other science blogs out there tho so don’t worry, #Science is a good place to start.

My High School Chemistry Cheat Sheet
4 years later and I still use this, it has been good to me. Not sure how or if I should credit this, it was just a hand-out my teacher gave us all at the beginning of class and I couldn’t find anything like it online so I just scanned it.

Star Trails
Was out near the Kitt Peak Observatory for this. Stacked about 30 different photos together using ‘Lighten’ and gradually brought up the opacity to give the comet-tail effect. Showing about 15 minutes of Earth’s rotation.
Full size on Flickr

zerostatereflex:

"Using ultrasound, a team of Japanese scientists has levitated small particles, and moved them around mid-air."

Incredible!

Three-Dimensional Mid-Air Acoustic Manipulation (2013-)
Yoichi Ochiai (The University of Tokyo)
Takayuki Hoshi (Nagoya Institute of Technology)
Jun Rekimoto (The University of Tokyo / Sony CSL)

Awesome!
Here is another thing on acoustic levitation

neuromorphogenesis:

Dream On: Why Sleep is So Important 

This infographic showcases some studies on just how dangerous—and costly—sacrificing sleep can be, and it concludes with some facts on how you can try and improve your sleep quality if it’s something you struggle with. 

by  JASON (FRUGAL DAD)

scienceyoucanlove:

Fact of the Day:
Persistent Pupillary Membrane (PPM) is a condition where remnants of the pupillary membrane, which covers the anterior surface of the lens during embryonic development, sustains as thin, web-like strands of connective or vascular tissue across the pupil. It rarely interferes with vision and usually deteriorates of its own accord. In rare, severe cases, it can be treated with laser eye surgery. Further reading: http://goo.gl/HVw6mD
(Photograph: EyeRounds.org, The University of Iowa www.webeye.ophth.uiowa.edu)

source 

sci-universe:

The first of the 2014 meteor showers – The Quadrantids –
peak on 3rd January. It is estimated that they will hit somewhere between 60 and 120 meteors per hour.

To find the Quadrantids’ radiant - the region in which the meteors seem to emanate - look for the constellation Boötes in the ea
st-northeast sky. Observers can look forward to dark skies since the night sky will be Moonless.
The meteor shower is predicted to climax around 19:30 Universal Time or or 2:30 PM Eastern Standard Time (EST). This places the northern Asia region in the best position to watch the show, though all northern hemisphere observers are encouraged to watch past 11 PM local worldwide. Remember: meteor showers are fickle beasties, with peak activity often arriving early or late. If you want more information, try Sky and Telescope/Universe Today/ Time and Date/Bad Astronomy
Image: Quadrantid Meteor through Trees by Jeff Berkes, 2011

Totally forgot about this! Gonna get some pics!

I doubt rates will get as high as 120/hour, maybe 60 tops with an average rate of ~25Apparently this meteor shower will peak at a much better time next year, near midnight instead of late-morning like this year, but there’s a full Moon then so watch it now unless you want to wait until 2016.
You will see higher rates the more north you live, since Bootes is near the North Star. And hey, there’s no bitchass Moon to ruin everything this time, yay!

Even more info, American Meteor Society
If anyone else is going to try and photograph it, here is a guide
Here is a chrome app to help find constellations too, Planetarium

naturalose:

Species in the Rhinochimaera family are known as long-nosed chimaeras. Their unusually long snouts (compared to other chimaeras) have sensory nerves that allow the fish to find food. Also, their first dorsal fin contains a mildly venomous spine that is used defensively. They are found in deep, temperate and tropical waters between 200 to 2,000 m in depth, and can grow to be up to 140 cm (4.5 ft) in length.
Chimaeras (also known as ghost sharks and ratfish) are an order of cartilaginous fish most closely related to sharks, but they have been evolutionarily isolated from them for over 400 million years.
(Info from WP and .gif from video by NOAA’s Okeanos Explorer, July 2013—this is NOT an animation!)

naturalose:

Species in the Rhinochimaera family are known as long-nosed chimaeras. Their unusually long snouts (compared to other chimaeras) have sensory nerves that allow the fish to find food. Also, their first dorsal fin contains a mildly venomous spine that is used defensively. They are found in deep, temperate and tropical waters between 200 to 2,000 m in depth, and can grow to be up to 140 cm (4.5 ft) in length.

Chimaeras (also known as ghost sharks and ratfish) are an order of cartilaginous fish most closely related to sharks, but they have been evolutionarily isolated from them for over 400 million years.

(Info from WP and .gif from video by NOAA’s Okeanos Explorer, July 2013—this is NOT an animation!)

zerostatereflex:

"Watch what happens when force is applied to amazing and mind bending Non-Newtonian Liquid and filmed in slow motion."

What is it?

Oobleck

"An inexpensive, non-toxic example of a non-Newtonian fluid is a suspension of starch (e.g. cornstarch) in water, sometimes called “oobleck” or “ooze” (1 part of water to 1.5–2 parts of corn starch]. [8][9] Uncooked imitation custard, a suspension of primarily cornflour, has the same properties. The name “oobleck” is derived from the Dr. Seuss book Bartholomew and the Oobleck.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-Newtonian_fluid

freshphotons:

"Taken by Igor Siwanowicz, the photo shows the open trap of an aquatic carnivorous plant known as a humped bladderwort (Utricularia gibba). The plant floats in water waiting for its prey to touch its trigger hairs, which cause the plant to open its trap so quickly that it sucks in water as well as some unlucky microinvertebrates. The pretty little flakes near the bottom of the image are single-cell algae that live inside the trap. The image is magnified 100 times." Via.

10 second exposure from 2013 to 2014

theoneaboutscience:

The ability of a dragonfly nymph to successfully snatch and grab food is directly related to its anus. The mouth-grabber (labium) is hydraulically activated. The dragonfly draws water in through the anus, clenches, then compresses its abdominal and thoracic muscles against the water-filled rectal chamber. This raises the internal body cavity pressure, and pushes the labium out –in a strike that takes 10 to 30 milliseconds.

The amount of internal pressure generated is about 6000 Pa, or 6 kPa; equivalent to 0.87 psi (pounds per square inch). That doesn’t seem like a lot, until you consider that big nymphs only weigh 100mg (0.0002 lbs), so generating almost a pound of pressure WITH THEIR BUTT is pretty impressive. A Camaro turbocharger produces 7 psi, so you could say this little insect has 1/7th of a Camaro in its ass.

The other amazing function of a dragonfly nymph rectum is jet-propulsion. By un-clenching their rectum, water in the rectal chamber can be jetted out at high pressure, pushing the nymph forward through the water. The forward thrust generated is 1.5 g in 0.1 second; nymphs’ top speed is 10cm/second. They can throttle their rectum back to produce varying amounts of thrust through the water.

But Wait! There’s More! The jet-propulsion butt-hydraulic system also is a gill. Dragonflies breathe through gills in their rectums; you can see some great photos of that above. Because dragonflies breathe through feathery gills, they are sensitive to lots of forms of aquatic pollution. (via Here Be Dragons - Wired Science)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

A bullet passes through a soap bubble in the schlieren photo above. The schlieren optical technique is sensitive to changes in the refractive index and, since a fluid’s refractive index changes with density, permits the visualization of shock waves. A strong curved bow shock is visible in front of the bullet as well as weaker lines marking additional shocks waves around the bullet. Impressively, the bullet’s passage is so fast (and the photo’s timing so perfect) that there are no imperfections or signs of bursting in the soap bubble. The photo’s caption suggests that the bubble may be filled with multiple gases. If they are unmixed and of differing densities, this may be the source of the speckling and plume-like structures inside the bubble. Incidentally, if anyone out there has high-speed schlieren video of a bullet passing through a soap bubble, I would love to see it. (Photo credit: H. Edgerton and K. Vandiver)

s-c-i-guy:

Cuttlefish Remember What, Where and When They Ate

In 1998, Nicky Clayton from the University of Cambridge published the first of many seminal experiments with western scrub-jays, showing that they can remember where they had stored food and which hoards were freshest. In other words, these bird brains also have episodic-like memories. We say “episodic-like” since we can’t really know if the animals store their what-where-when information into single coherent memories in the way that we do. Still, it’s clear that the components are there.

Since then, the episodic-like memory club has grown to include the great apes, rats, hummingbirds, and pigeons. But these are all mammals and birds. Christelle Jozet-Alves from Normandie University wanted to know if the same skills existed in animals that are very different to these usual suspects. She turned to the common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis).

Like octopuses and squid, cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) are cephalopods—a group of animals known for their amazing color-changing skin and sophisticated intelligence. Cuttlefish are separated from birds and mammals by almost a billion years of evolution. But Jozet-Alves, together with Clayton and Marion Bertin, has shown that they too can “keep track of what they have eaten, and where and how long ago they ate”.

Read More

like-wildfire:

Neuronal Network by Zhong Hua

Captured by Johns Hopkins University School Of Medicine grad student Zhong Hua, courtesy of Nikon’s Small World projectthis image depicts fluorescent neurons in the peripheral nervous system of an embryonic mouse under a light microscope.